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Rocket’s Music Room

11 Oct






BUY
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Global Food Disparity: A Photo Diary

8 Oct

Meet the The Manzo family of Sicily. Their weekly expenditure is 214.36 Euros or $260.11. Note the copious amount of bread.

“In an increasingly globalized world, it’s still sometimes shocking to see just how disparate our lives are compared with other human beings around the world. A book of photographs by Peter Menzel called “Hungry Planet: What the World Eats” (“©Peter Menzel www.menzelphoto.com. Ten Speed Press, published in 2005) makes a relevant point with great irony: at a time when hundreds of millions of people don’t have enough to eat, hundreds of millions more are eating too much and are overweight or obese. In observing what six billion eat for dinner the authors note,

“Today, more people are overweight than underweight.”

It is these cultural differences, emphasized and reinforced by the author, which exemplifies the lifestyles and dietary habits of people around the world. In the United States, processed foods are par for course. In the Philippines, fresh fruit and vegetables play a far more significant role. In the harsh Chad sun, a family of six exists on a measly $1.23 per week.

You can buy the book here.

You may have seen some of these photographs from the book as it been widely circulating on the net, if not, I urge you to purchase it and as one of my friends said via email: “I don’t know about you, but I’m counting my blessings.” Traveling to 24 countries, from Greenland, Chad, and Japan to Germany, Guatemala, and the United States, Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio photographed 30 families accompanied by a careful display of a week’s worth of food. Chronicling the enormous differences in eating habits between industrial and developing countries, each section includes a family portrait, along with their groceries, and a listing of how much was spent in each food group. In the tradition of MATERIAL WORLD, this timely, fascinating photography book illustrates not only the growth of fast food consumption worldwide, but also the transformation of diets across the planet. One notes that except where poverty is the most extreme, packaged cookies and candies have gripped the world as have soft drinks, primarily coca-colas. I found it both encouraging that there is so much local food culture left in the world, and deeply depressing that our processed food culture has spread so far and wide. If you look closely at the types of food being purchased you can see the difference between “eating to live” and “living to eat.”

Germany: The Melander family of Bargteheide
Food expenditure for one week: 375.39 Euros or $500.07.

United States: The Revis family of North Carolina (I hope most American families eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and less junk food than this family.)Food expenditure for one week $341.98

Mexico: The Casales family of Cuernavaca
Food expenditure for one week: 1,862.78 Mexican Pesos or $189.09. Note the profusion of fruits & vegetables.

Poland: The Sobczynscy family of Konstancin-Jeziorna
Food expenditure for one week: 582.48 Zlotys or $151.27

Egypt: The Ahmed family of Cairo
Food expenditure for one week: 387.85 Egyptian Pounds or $68.53

Ecuador: The Ayme family of Tingo
Food expenditure for one week: $31.55

Bhutan: The Namgay family of Shingkhey Village
Food expenditure for one week: 224.93 ngultrum or $5.03. This feeds a family of 11! Remarkable.

Chad: The Aboubakar family of Breidjing Camp
Food expenditure for one week: 685 CFA Francs or $1.23. No comment.

Kuwait: The Al Haggan family of Kuwait City
Food expenditure for one week: 63.63 dinar or $221.45. Most foodstuffs in this State is subsidized.

Mongolia: The Batsuuri family of Ulaanbaatar
Food expenditure for one week: 41,985.85 togrogs or $40.06

China: The Dong family of Beijing
Food expenditure for one week: 1,233.76 Yuan or $175

Japan: The Ukita family of Kodaira City
Food expenditure for one week: 37,699 Yen or $317.25


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Scent Capturing Postcard Printer

13 Aug

China-based designer Li Jingxuan, has conceived a ‘scent capturing printer’ concept for sony that analyzes certain smells coming from foods, and translates them into a postcard. The system works using an ‘electronic nose’, a sensor that samples pattern recognition to generate and characterize odors. The printer would then simulate these captured fragrances by mixing aroma based inks stored within the device and transferring them onto a special photo-paper stock modules. once printed, the user would peel a flap on the back side of the image to reveal the captured scents. The project adds a new dynamic perspective in communicating through interactive postcards, where the idea of sharing and capturing certain moments in time becomes highly enjoyable.

Li Jingxuan’s ‘scent capturing printer’ project took part in the 2012 sony student design workshop.


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Working Nintendo NES controller coffee table

23 Apr

Amazing addition to any living room.

Available on Etsy


Porky Hefer of Animal Farm

8 Mar


Biomimicry is a discipline whereby the design of nature and its various systems are examined and emulated in order to create sustainable solutions to solve real world problems. Analyzing the methods in which members of the ploceidae, or weaver bird family craft their beautifully artistic and humble dwellings, south african designer porky hefer of animal farm, one of this year’s Design Indaba conference speakers, references their intricate construction process and has produced a series of large-scale nests fit for humans based on the birds’ techniques. Porky’s series of ‘weaver’s nests’ have no real inner steel framework. Each are meticulously crafted out of all natural materials such as bark and branches and woven in such a way that the final form offers a sturdy retreat fit for at least 2 adults.









They should have these at camp grounds.

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Happy Pills Vases for Venini

29 Feb


Italian designer Fabio Novembre has created stacked vases for renowned italian glass manufacturer venini. Made of world-famous murano glass, the containers are in the form of pharmaceutical drugs, with faint chemical compositions written on each. Each color combination represents a different hormone, testosterone, adrenaline, oxytocin, phenethylamine and estrogen. The placebo is meant to take the place of medication, with the philosophy that playful design has the same hormonal effects as ‘happy pills’.

“Usefulness is a concept that more and more fades away among the objects surrounding us. What we expect from these silent friends is to keep us company, make us laugh or in the best option, excite us. Hormonal chemistry influenced by material chemistry. Happy Pills are a placebo coming from Murano that, with shapes and colors, would substitute pharmacological solutions.”

Privacy pop bed tent

23 Feb


it may not be as ideal as having your own space, the ‘privacy pop‘ tent would definitely come in handy in any shared bedroom, whether its with a sibling or in a dorm – situations where the luxury of privacy is not exactly possible. zip windows on each side of the tent offer ventilation and light when desired. the collapsible structure is designed to fit any twin or twin XL beds, and is easy to transport as a result of a folding design and compact carrying tote (*mattress and bed frame not included).



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Glass house

10 Oct


Glasshouse‘ by Czech designer Kristýna Pojerová is a mini greenhouse that double functions as pendant lamp.



Glassart

9 Oct


Vienna-based glass and chandelier producer J. & L. lobmeyr celebrates the 80th anniversary of Austrian designer adolf loos’s legendary no. 248 bar set. The cylindrical glass tumbler, considered to be provocatively simple at its conception, has been produced by lobmeyr ever since.



Sunglasses at night

11 Sep


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